Zvuloon Dub System | Anbessa Dub

A quality Reggae and Dub production from “Israel’s number one reggae band”. Lots of horns and driving drum and bass on top of analogue production and tape recording.

“Everything is analogue,” says Smilan. “We take all those old sounds as reference points, we record onto tape. We do it the real way.”

Anbessa Dub, which although not a classic dub album, is filled with the atmosphere of vintage Jamaican roots reggae, mixes old Ethiopian songs arranged in the Zvuloon style, along with some originals, like the opener “Alemitu,” where the arrangement moves smoothly between Lee Perry’s studio and a downtown Addis club in 1973. It’s completely convincing, in part because of the equipment the band uses in its studio.

When Haile Selassie, Emperor of Ethiopia, the man known as Ras Tafari, visited Jamaica on April 21, 1966, more than one hundred thousand Rastafarians were waiting at Kingston Airport to see the man they revered as the Messiah. For a brief moment, still celebrated by the faithful as Grounation Day, the two countries came together. 18 years later, in 1984, an Ethiopian Jewish family, members of the lost tribe of Israel, walked across the desert, making the long trek to their homeland. And now those three cultures – Jamaica, Ethiopia, and Israel – merge on the new album by Tel Aviv-based Zvuloon Dub System, called Anbessa Dub.